Showing Up Sporadically Isn’t A Strategy!

by Paul Castain on July 5, 2011

Pardon me for being direct, blunt and “going there” sans foreplay but . . .

If you aren’t “showing up” on a regular basis, you run a high risk of failing as a sales professional!

And what, pray tell is “showing up”?

It’s all the activities that comprise your sales mix such as

Calling Prospects

Email & Snail Mail

Traditional & Social Networking

Creative Door Openers

Etc

Note: When I say “show up” I don’t just mean going through the motions . . . I mean giving each part of your sales mix everything you got!

Sounds like such a basic, “Sales 101” moment we’re sharing here and yet . . .

I see people on Linkedin, Twitter and Facebook go hot and heavy, then completely disappear for large chunks of time, only to reappear, rinse and repeat!

I’ve seen the same thing with prospecting ranging from being disciplined for a week or two to putting prospects on a ridiculously light call frequency.

I could bore you with more examples but they will actually move us away from the core of the problem.

Nobody puts “Go off my client’s and prospect’s radar screen” as a To Do item!

We all have good intentions but . . .

We get caught up!

Caught up in responding to things!

Caught up in fires that need to be put out!

Caught up in the administrative “stuff”!

Caught up in the “summertime blues”?

While we hold the activities that drive our revenue hostage!

I’ll leave you with three very quick thoughts to ponder . . .

1)   Take a good look at your “sales mix” . . . are you showing up with it consistently or sporadically?

2)   Do you schedule your “showing up” or does it happen only if there’s time after you get out of “response mode”?

3)   Are you willing to take action on items 1 and 2?

And I know you know this, but what the heck . . .

If business is moving at light speed

And your prospect/client is busier and more distracted than ever

Making cameo appearances won’t get you noticed dude!

Paul Castain coaches sales people and trains organizations to achieve higher levels of performance. For more information, please click here

  • Tim Mushey

    Great post Paul. This is a real gut check for all reps (myself included)! It is so easy to get distracted and forget what really matters in a sales role. Thanks as always..

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    Well stated Tim . . . Thank you!

  • http://adamoneill.net Adam

    Paul I agree with Tim, this is a great reminder and “gut check” for us in sales. I have had many customers tell me the reason I get their business is I show up. Not only do I get their business they share with me information related to their business they will not share with my competition. What a huge benefit this is when I am trying to solve their problems. The more complete the information the better.

    Thanks for the reminder Paul and to keep this in front of mind!

  • http://blog.esimplestudios.com Gabriele Maidecchi

    Failing to be present in the client’s “business life” was one of the early mistakes my company was making, and I believe it’s on of the most common ones in startup businesses. You simply don’t have the experience to know how to manage certain things, sales included, unless you hire a professional straight away, which we obviously didn’t.
    They sar far from the eyes far from the heart, and this is very true in sales. You can’t expect a client to consider you for a project if he doesn’t even remember about you.

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    That’s a huge benefit of showing up Adam!

    Thanks for pointing that out!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    Very true Gabriele and I think sometimes we kid ourselves into thinking that our clients have us on their mind.

    Thanks for stopping by!

  • http://www.salessells.com Wim @ Sales Sells

    Hi Paul, I must admit I’m guilty too here. I would like to post more in the linkedin group, but often find myself short on time. Guess I need to sort out my priorities :)

    Thanks for the reminder,
    Wim

  • Barb Giamanco

    No doubt that I fall victim to this on occasion. Since I work for myself, I’m not only selling my services but delivering them also. At some point, something has to give and that might mean that I’m not as active posting in my LinkedIn groups. Since business is going really well, I’m working to correct what I feel is a great problem to have:)

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    That is a great problem to have Barb . . . congrats!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    I’m surprised to hear that Wim because it seems like you show up consistently on LI and Twitter where you and bump into each other most often.

    Let me know when you figure out how to juggle all this stuff and you and I can write the future best selling book “We Figured It Out”

    Thanks for stopping by Wim!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    Thanks Karen!

    Wishing you an awesome Wednesday!

  • http://adamoneill.net Adam

    Paul, after reading your title again I have come to realize this is one of the times I disagree with your viewpoint.

    Showing up sporadically IS a strategy….. a strategy for failure!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    I willingly stand corrected my friend!

    Well put Adam!

  • John Patrick

    Great stuff, Paul! It’s so easy to focus on the next sale and in meeting the demands of the day to forget to show up. Problem is, if we fail to do so, you can bet the competition will. Good reminder to reach out and hug someone today … Thanks!!!

  • Jim Kozak

    I know that I have been fallen off the Twitter wagon to some extent.  Just not posting as much as I would like.  I have been more focused on LinkedIn.  Seems like people are a bit more open to actual discussions there.  Still need to spend time on both.

    Have a great summer….keep rockin!!!

  • http://twitter.com/jacobespa Jacob Esparza

    Thanks for the post Paul.

    The one thing I would add is when you do show up, follow through. It’s so annoying when you’re in a the middle of a good back-n-forth (via in-person, email, phone) and the other person says something like – “Oh yeah, I’ll introduce you to so-in-so and it never happens”. Empty promises are my number 1 relationship killer.

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    That’s a great point Jacob!

    Thanks for pointing out this critical component! 

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    Nothing wrong with spending your time where you’re getting your best return Jim . . . pretty darn smart if you ask me!

    Enjoy your summer as well my friend!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    I’m very superstitious when it comes to my competitors “out showing me up” :)

    Thanks John!

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