What’s Your Story That You’re Sticking To?

by Paul Castain on August 26, 2012

Out of hundreds of speeches I’ve given in the last few years, I only had this happen to me once and it didn’t sit well with me.

I came to the portion of a speech where I told people why I get irritated with people who claim to know things and yet they aren’t doing these things they know.

For those of you who know me, you know its because I was that “dude” and I paid dearly for it . . . to the tune of a lost business, 60,000 in debt, both cars getting repo’d and just about all of my self esteem.

That was 1995 but it might as well have been yesterday!

When I tell my story, I don’t do it for sympathy. I don’t do it as some canned motivational “rah rah” I tell it so you can benefit from my supreme “F” up.

If I can offer one other personal reason without bringing us to a far away to a town called “Tangentville” its also because I made a promise during a personal “come to Jesus moment” that this would be part of how I would repay a debt for a second chance.

Call me crazy, but I don’t like to wuss out on a debt with God.

Any who, you also need to know that when I tell my story, people ride the emotional roller coaster with me. It moves people and many people are driven to action because of it.

So here’s what happened . . .

On the break, someone came over to me looking to give me some unsolicited advice. That’s cool, because most coaches I know can dish it but they can never take it.

The person told me that I never should have told that story and that he was confident that I lost points with the audience for telling it.

I told him that while I appreciated the feedback . . .I really didn’t care about nor do I say things to score points with anyone but more importantly this was my story and I was sticking to it.

I probably could have taken the easy way out and told him that the person who hired me, requested this specifically but its not in my DNA to skirt a much bigger point.

I didn’t say this next part but its in my heart right now so what the heck . . .

I don’t hide my failures from anyone. This is who I am. Tough sh*t if you don’t like it!

I’ve often said that everyone has a story and wants to be heard but . . .

Are you willing to tell the REAL story or are you too busy looking to tell the one that’s safe?

Your turn . . .

Do you hold back, filter and maybe even polish yourself up so much that you hold a little someone called “YOU” hostage? What’s your story that you’re sticking to?

I train individuals and organizations to be lethal! Click here for 10 Ways I Rock With My Clients or email me

paul@yoursalesplaybook.com and let me know how I can help you hit new levels of awesomeness!

  • http://www.PresidentsPilotsEntrepreneurs.com/ Derrick Jones

    Well Paul, since you asked, here’s my story. Incredible timing as I put up this post on Thursday, August 23rd. It took me some time before I could do this in such a public way but I said what the hell and did it. So here it is. Warning. It is lengthy. My hope is that many people will benefit from this: http://bit.ly/P5kEf0

  • Marc Zazeela

    Paul – I have lots of “warts”. I am not ashamed of them. If someone wants to judge me for what I have done in the past, I suppose that’s fine so long as they have absolutely no flaws themselves.

    Who are we to judge anyone lest we be the subject of their judgements? Are you prepared to have someone judge you?

    And, often the people who throw the most rocks are often the ones living in the glass houses.

    I am hopeful that people can see me for who I am, not necessarily who I was.

    Cheers,
    Marc

  • Marc Zazeela

    Paul – I have lots of “warts”. I am not ashamed of them. If someone wants to judge me for what I have done in the past, I suppose that’s fine so long as they have absolutely no flaws themselves.

    Who are we to judge anyone lest we be the subject of their judgements? Are you prepared to have someone judge you?

    And, often the people who throw the most rocks are often the ones living in the glass houses.

    I am hopeful that people can see me for who I am, not necessarily who I was.

    Cheers,
    Marc

  • Drew Meikle

    As far as I’m concerned your story is one of success and encouragement. Thanks Paul.

    Sure the 25 year old computer-whiz billionaire, with zero public set-back has an interesting story, but the man that actually has taken the obstacles that come with a more typical business life and has turned it to success- well that’s more than interesting- it’s useful and encouraging.

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